New anti-mosquito net proves more protective against malaria

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new anti-mosquito net treated with piperonyl butoxide to be more protective against mosquito
new anti-mosquito net treated with piperonyl butoxide to be more protective against mosquito

A new anti-mosquito net treated with piperonyl butoxide has proven to be more protective against mosquito.

This was the outcome of a trial carried out by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in Tanzania.

The trial which involved 15,000 children showed that the new piperonyl butoxide anti-mosquito net was more protective against mosquito and reduced malaria infections by 44% in the first year compared to nets treated with pyrethroid only.

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Speaking of the new development, researcher Natacha Protopopoff from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine had this to say;

“It’s imperative we try and remain one step ahead of insecticide resistance which threatens to reverse the great gains made in combating malaria.”

She said the study involved 48 villages in the north-west area of Tanzania where high levels of resistance to pyrethroid have been recorded.

This outcome had prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to support the wider use of piperonyl butoxide treated nets in parts of Africa where mosquitoes have become resistant to pyrethroid against its former recommendations.

The study was engineered due to concerns that the increasing resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides across Africa downplays on former efforts made to cut down the menace of the disease through the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and sprays.

Although malaria death toll reduced by 62% between 2000 and 2015, WHO estimated that in 2016, 445,000 deaths mostly among children under five still occurred in the poorest parts of sub-Saharan Africa.

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Mark Rowland, principal investigator from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, likened the trial as a “game-changer” that could help community protection.

“This will ensure insecticide treated nets will remain an effective intervention for malaria control, and justify the continued investment and research on the alternative insecticides for use on nets, Mark said.

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