Man who ate world’s hottest pepper lands in hospital

0
163
world's hottest pepper

A man has been taken to hospital with a severe headache after he ate the world’s hottest pepper, the so-called “Carolina Reaper”.

The 34-year-old, who was not identified, had eaten just one of the chilies at a pepper eating contest in upstate New York.

 Immediately after the competition, he began dry heaving (throwing up but without expelling any substance) and developed intense neck and head pain starting at the back, which later spread across the whole head.

READ: Not all herbs are safe for consumption – Herbal Expert

At first, the man experienced short splitting pains lasting seconds at a time but later began to feel excruciating headache before he decided to go to the emergency room.

The patient told doctors he did not have any tingling sensation or weakness, slurred speech or transient loss of vision, and he had just a slightly high blood pressure of 134/69mm Hg.

Tests for various neurological conditions came back negative, until scans revealed several arteries in his brain had constricted.

This prompted doctors to diagnose him with thunderclap headache secondary to reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) — a temporary artery narrowing often accompanied by thunderclap headache.

“RCVS is characterized by multifocal cerebral arterial constriction that resolves within days to weeks and often presents with a thunderclap headache,” Dr. Kilothungan Gunasekaran, from New York’s Bassett Medical Center, explained.

ALSO READ: Mother kills her children with rat poison

He said RCVS can occur without an identifiable cause, as an idiosyncratic reaction to certain medications (ergotamine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, alpha– sympathomimetic decongestants and triptans) or secondary to an illicit drug (cocaine, amphetamines and ecstasy).

“No cases of RCVS secondary to peppers or cayenne have been previously reported,” he said, “but ingestion of cayenne pepper has been associated with coronary vasospasm and acute myocardial infarction,” he added.

The man’s symptoms cleared up on their own and a CT scan five weeks later showed the affected arteries had returned to their normal width.

Facebook Comments
Disclaimer: Pinnaclehealthradio.org does not guarantee any specific results as a result of the procedures mentioned here and the results may vary from person to person. The topics in these pages including text, graphics, videos and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only and not to be substituted for professional medical advice.

Leave a Reply